1980 Turbo Trans Am (Faust)

This is Faust, my 1980 Turbo Trans Am.

I bought it from the original owner in May, 1999, and its’ been with me ever since.

About the 1980 Turbo T/A:

This “Starlight Black” (paint code 19) beauty was purchased in 1999 from the original owner who wisely kept it isolated from Ontario’s harsh winter elements. You can check out some pictures lower down on the page. Click on one of the tiny photos to see it up close and personal!

Equipment: Below is a list of Faust’s options and accessories. The “standard equipment” is that which was either standard or optional on any Firebird model, but was standard on the Trans Am in 1980. The “optional equipment” is that which was optional on the Trans Am in 1980.

Standard Equipment:

A2: power brakes (rear drums replaced by WS6’s discs)
N65: stow-away spare
D80: rear deck spoiler
NK3: formula steering wheel
MX1: THM 350 3-speed automatic transmission
G80: limited-slip differential
U17: full instrumentation (rally gauges)
D35: sport mirrors, LH remote
windshield integrated radio aerial
power steering

Optional Equipment:

LU8: turbo V8, required C60 $350
C60: air conditioning $566
C49: rear window defroster $107
BS1: sound insulation package $34
TR9: lamp group $22
N33: tilt steering $81
AO1: tinted glass $68
D53: hood bird decal $125
B18: custom interior in Carmine Red hobnail cloth, includes AK1 colour-keyed seat belts $187
B37: colour-keyed floor mats $27
U69: AM/FM radio $153
UP8: dual front and rear speakers $43
B83: side window drip rails $26
A31: power windows $143
WS6: “special appearance package” – actually a   performance suspension package, which included: $481

4 wheel disc brakes  15″ X 8.0″ aluminum wheels with 225/70R-15 Goodyear tires  1.25″ front stabilizer bar with hard plastic bushings  0.75″ rear stabilizer bar  Stiffer rear springs  Stiffer rear shackle bushings   Firmer shock valving   Closer ratio steering (fixed 14:1)    Lower control arm supports

As you can see by the pics, there are also some custom additions, including a Pioneer stereo system, custom wheels fitted with 235-60 R15 Cooper Cobra GT  rubber, and rear window louvres. This car makes for one heck of a fun ride, and yet it is still a very manageable, compliant and comfortable around-towner. The best of all worlds! It is also not horribly thirsty, although when the pedal goes down hard the gas gauge goes with it :)

Interesting facts: only 21.8 % of 1980 Firebirds received the turbo V8. That’s not as high as I would have expected, when you consider that Trans Am and Formula buyers are more performance-minded than their Esprit and base counterparts. Only 27.8% got four wheel disc brakes – an option that could be had outside of the WS6 package. Faust is one of 5 856 “normal” (non SE or Pace Car) Trans Am turbos to be made without the hatch roof (T-tops), and I must say that I don’t miss the T-tops! A total of 50 896 Trans Ams were made in 1980.

This is the special Hoodbird for turbo T/As. Note that the bird faces the opposite direction as on a naturally aspirated T/A.
 
What most cars see of Faust. Pontiac made a big deal (“A new breed of Wow!”) about the full-width tail lights in 1979. This styling trait carried on right until the end of the T/A in 2002.
 
Faust’s interior is RED! Note the famous engine-turned “disco dash” and hobnail-patterned seats. The fuzzy dice were a gift from a friend.
Here you see all four of Faust’s headlights on, which is a rarity!
Seen here chillin’ on his last day of driving in 2012, you can see that Faust has aged well, running just as strongly (better even!) than the day I got him!
Seen from the rear three quarters, the T/A’s distinctive “ribcage” exhaust tip splitters and reflective strip below the tail lights really show up. Note the louvers, too, very de rigeur in the 1980s! They’ve served well to preserve the very fragile parcel shelf!
 

UPDATE! Go check out what makes this sexy beast move – visit the Under The Hood section!

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